How Life Works

Mar 25, 2017
Updated: 3/18/2017
 - Sponsored by How Life Works

6 Quotes That Explain Why Technology Still Scares Us

6 Quotes That Explain Why Technology Still Scares Us

By Daniel Wesley

We live in a technological world. Smartphones and the Internet have completely redefined what it means to be connected. And, like it or not, unplugging from that connection is mighty tricky. But before you take the red pill or start arming yourself for the fight against Skynet, check out some quotes that speak volumes about the new, crazy world we live in today:

“Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that, for some people, it is a complete substitute for life.” — Andrew Brown

A smartphone is both a blessing and a curse. It can produce insane productivity, firing off emails and documents with speeds previously unknown to man. Unfortunately, it can also create crushing anxiety when the Internet connection is compromised. Suddenly, the small slab of aluminum that once provided you so much joy and satisfaction is worthless. And you’re no longer as powerful as you once were.

The best example of this is on a flight with no Wi-Fi connectivity. Passengers can only play solitaire and read the in-flight magazine for so long. Watch carefully, and you can observe the slow descent into madness: the guy in seat 10D obsessively chewing his nails; the lady in 12C rapidly typing emails she knows won’t send; the teenager in 3B slamming his head against the fold-out tray.

These “smart” phones have become a source of anxiety, sadness, elation, and satisfaction. Who could have predicted these little screens could dictate our every mood?

“It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity.” — Albert Einstein

What happens if there’s a major power shortage? Will people know where to find answers to their questions? I worry my kids will never experience the beauty of searching through books or asking a librarian for help. As wonderful as Siri is, she won’t be able to encourage and educate my kids the way a librarian can.

Technology has absolutely put a damper on our face-to-face interactions. We’ve become accustomed to texting; we find ourselves grasping for a minute to gather our thoughts while talking in person. We miss the lull where we can carefully type and retype our thoughts.

“Life was so simple when apples and blackberries were fruit, a tweet was the sound of nature, and face books were photo albums.” — Carl Henegan

Think of what we did 10 years ago when we had good news to share. We didn’t run to a computer to post the news online. We picked up a phone and started calling everyone we knew. Now, stop and think of how many times messages are missed, misconstrued, or not conveyed at all. Also consider all the pain and suffering that occurs when one family member is left out or misses the online invitation.

Now, a general post on social media, blasted to everyone in our contacts, is how we make sure to invite everyone to parties, gatherings, or special events. When the invite is so impersonal, why are we offended when someone doesn’t show?

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.” — Carl Sagan

Short and sweet, someone I know thought a CD-ROM drive was a cup holder. Yes, this actually happened. Yes, this person was serious. I was so shocked. I had no words or corrective actions to offer for fear of embarrassing us both!

We all know someone who searched for hours for the “any” key, and now there are kids who don’t understand the meaning of the word “rewind.” As technology continues to make leaps and bounds, how long will it be before humanity itself is left behind?

“I won’t be impressed with technology until I can download food.” — Unknown

It’s coming — just wait. Right now, we can order pizza by sending a single text. And we’re only 10 years into the smart device revolution. While we haven’t quite reached the future we all expected back in the 80s, there are advancements today that we couldn’t have possibly dreamed of 30 years ago. I personally cannot wait for when my smartphone will materialize a cup of coffee.

“Don’t you type at me in that tone of voice!” — Variation on a quote from Dorothy Parker

With the advent of texting and email as the dominant forms of communication, an odd trend has emerged. I BET YOU CAN’T HELP BUT READ THIS AS YELLING. I SOUND ANGRY, AND EVEN MORE ANGRY WHEN IT’S IN BOLD!

We’ve developed a whole new method of communicating tone. Emoji, Caps Lock, and the oh-so-dreaded “k” all leave the receiver to read between the lines. It’s reached the point where even the most basic response is considered and reconsidered before being sent.

Humanity’s reliance on technology has caused us to alter how we interact with ourselves and our world at the most fundamental level. And while we can all agree that these advances have brought many positive changes, it’s hard to deny that challenges are still ahead.

Daniel Wesley founded Quote.com, the authority on all things quote-worthy.

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This article sponsored by How Life Works Copyright Howlifeworks.com 2017